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William Loring Andrews Bibliography (1837-1920)

Issued In

Limited Editions

 

 

(A work in progress.)

 

Lawrence H. Conklin

Wallingford, Connecticut

06492

 

 

Foreword to the bibliography.

 

A compilation of this type is limited by the availability for examination of copies of the books it describes. A few of William Loring Andrews’ limited issues are extremely rare (in some instances only two copies were published) and have never been seen by me. Additionally, it should be kept in mind, that he had great fun creating his works and, as publisher, he individualized and customized many copies. For instance, one can never be certain that the little remarque engravings seen on some frontispiece plates, and never noted by Andrews, were produced for all the copies of that particular issue since all copies cannot be located for examination. This is also true in the case of those books with plates occasionally printed on genuine vellum but not called for in the contents listings; second titlepages, color-printed titlepages, extra frontispieces, additional engravings and so on.

 

 

All introductory bibliographical material shown within quotation marks and not credited otherwise, comes from foreword matter in the Andrews books. Other descriptions come from Bibliography of the printed works of William Loring Andrews in The Grolier Club Year Book of 1921.

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The Early Efforts

 

Andrews once said of his earliest works— they are “simply reprints, nothing more,” but they are more, if in no other way than the manner in which they show their editor’s selectivity and the hint they give us at what was to come. The last of these Andrews “incunabula” was done in 1868 and it was not until 1885 that his first original work, A Choice Collection Of Books, was published.

 

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1. Eulogy On Thomas Crawford. New York, 1865.

 

Eulogy On Thomas Crawford

by Thomas Hicks.

New York: 1865.

 

 

Privately printed for subscribers at the Riverside Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 103 pages. All copies contained three wood-engraved plates of designs for Crawford’s “Statue of Freedom” as mounted India-proofs as well as a process-print of a medal depicting Crawford, used as a frontispiece.

 

This is a reprint of a newspaper article ????????????

 

 

1.1. Seventy (70) copies octavo.

 

1.2. Twenty-five (25) copies quarto.

 

1.3. Five (5) copies octavo on India paper.

 

1.4. Two (2) copies on large Holland, hand-made paper.

 

Notes: A copy of 1.1 was examined and Andrews has numbered it in holograph and initialed it in red ink on a front blank leaf. This copy, No. 35, was subscribed to by T. H. Morrell. [A bookseller?] It retains the leather booklabel of Robert Hoe. A copy, “one of 100 copies” and another, one of two copies (1.4), are listed in Swann Galleries sale #378 of March 18, 1954. Andrews does not acknowledge the existence of 1.4 on the edition page of the book.

 

In a typed, one page, inventory of William Loring Andrews’ titles which were, on February 1, 1901 in the library of Tracy Dows is listed a copy of 1.3 as described. Dows was a member of both the Grolier Club and The Society of Iconophiles.

 

Thomas Crawford (1813-1857) was a sculptor who was highly celebrated in his time and is chiefly remembered for his “Statue of Freedom” which sits atop the Washington, D.C. Capitol’s senate wing.

 

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2. Madame Jumel Obituary. New York, 1865.

 

Madame Eliza B. Jumel

Obituary

In

The New York Times

Of

July 18th, 1865

 

Thirty Copies

Privately Printed,

For W.L. Andrews

1865

 

Quarto. Pages [v] 10.

 

2.1. Thirty (30) copies.

 

2.2. Four (4) copies on writing paper.

 

Notes: One copy of 2.1 was printed on large paper or, at least, on paper with large margins, unopened and untrimmed, in plain wrappers. 2.2 not seen, but a copy so described is recorded in  Dows, (1901).

 

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3. Fanny: A Poem. New York, 1866.

 

Fanny:

A Poem.

By

Fitz-Greene Halleck.

New York:

1866.

 

Octavo. Engraved portrait of Fitz-Greene Halleck on India paper. All copies are numbered and initialed by W.L.A. Contains three pages of notes by Halleck written expressly for this edition.

 

“Edition Of Seventy [numbered] copies Printed For W.L. Andrews.”

 

3.1. Seventy (70) copies quarto. Subscription price $10.00.

 

3.2. Five (5) copies on large Chinese paper. Not seen, but so listed in Dows, (1901).

 

3.3. Three (3) copies on large Chinese paper. (Not seen.)

 

 (This description is not complete.)

 

Notes: Halleck’s “Fanny: A Poem” was first published in 1819. The portrait of Halleck which is used as the frontispiece, was engraved for Andrews on steel by Charles Burt after a miniature on ivory that was painted by Nathaniel Rogers.  Rogers was a first rank miniaturist in the early part of the nineteenth century.  The miniature had been presented to Andrews by Halleck. Occasionally titles 3. and 4. are found bound together.

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4. Lines to the Recorder. New York, 1866.

 

Lines

To

The Recorder.

By

Fitz-Greene Halleck.

 

New York:

1866

 

“Edition Of Seventy copies Printed For W.L. Andrews.” Includes three pages of notes by Fitz-Greene Halleck written expressly for this edition.

 

4.1. Seventy (70) copies. Quarto. (This description is not complete.)

 

4.2. Three (3) copies on large Chinese paper.

 

Notes:  No copy of 4.2 seen but one so described is listed in Dows (1901). The “Recorder” of Deeds referred to in the poem above was Richard Riker (1773-1842) the holder of this position in the New York City government from 1815 to 1819 and again from 1821 to 1823. Occasionally titles 3. and 4. are found bound together.

 

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5. Reminiscences of an Old Yorker. New York, 1867.

 

Reminiscences

Of

An Old Yorker

By The Late

William A. Duer, LL.D.

President Of Columbia College, etc.

New York:

Printed For W. L. Andrews

1867

 

5. Thirty-five (35) copies quarto, bound in green cloth, each numbered and initialed by William Loring Andrews.

 

Notes: These personal reminiscences of William Alexander Duer (1780-1858), and descriptions of his everyday life as a boy and man in late 18th century New York City, first appeared in the newspaper The American Mail. They were published serially from June 5th to August 21st, 1847 over the nom-de-plume “Peregrine Mindful,” and could have been entitled “Reminiscences of an Old [New] Yorker.”

 

This work and the Jumel obituary, 2.1, were issued in the smallest number of copies of all the Andrews publications.

 

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6. Fitz-Greene Halleck. New York, 1868.

 

Fitz-Greene Halleck

By

Evert A. Duyckinck

from Putnam’s Magazine, February 1868

Privately Printed For W.L. Andrews

New York

1868

 

“Fifty [numbered] Copies. No._______”

 

6. Fifty (50) copies. Quarto. Perhaps this was issued with the portrait of Halleck as called for in the original Putnam’s Magazine article.

 

Notes: This work was apparently struck from the original galleys of the magazine article. A portrait is called for in the magazine  printing, but may not have been issued with the off-print. The only copies seen have portraits that do not seem to be part of the original pagination. Copies exist that are not numbered.

 

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The Later Works

 

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7. A Choice Collection of Books. New York, 1885.

 

A CHOICE COLLECTION

OF

BOOKS

FROM THE

ALDINE PRESSES

IN THE POSSESSION

OF * * * * * *

 

WITH A SHORT INTRODUCTORY ACCOUNT OF THE ALDUS FAMILY,

TAKEN MOSTLY FROM

HORNE’S INTRODUCTION TO BIBLIOGRAPHY.

 

 

NEW-YORK:

PRIVATELY PRINTED.

MDCCCLXXXV

 

Octavo, pages 23. Two illustrations by the Bierstadt process. On Holland paper, in blue wrappers which fold over the first and last pages and are glued to the spine. Facsimile of tilepage printed in gold on upper cover and an Aldine anchor printed on lower cover. “Press of Theo. L. De Vinne & Co. New-York”

 

“This edition consists of fifty copies, all of which are numbered and signed. This is No___”

 

7. Fifty (50) copies. Not published for sale.

 

Notes: No author’s name given, but the book is signed by Andrews on the limitation page, below the statement— “This is No___.”

 

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8. Roger Payne. New York, 1892.

 

Roger Payne

And His Art

A Short Account Of His Life

And Work As A Binder

 

By

William Loring Andrews

New-York

Printed At The De Vinne Press

1892

 

Octavo, pages 36. Dark blue cloth. Eleven illustrations by the Bierstadt process, 10 of which are in gold and colors. With a prefatory note by Beverly Chew. A facsimile of the signature of Roger Payne is stamped in gilt lettering on front cover.

 

“One hundred and twenty copies printed on Holland paper, and ten on Japan.”

 

8.1. One hundred twenty (120) copies on Holland paper. Subscription price $5.00.

 

8.2. Ten (10) copies on Japan paper. Subscription price $10.00.

 

Notes: In the only copy located of 8.2 in binding as issued, (formerly the Alexander M. Hudnut copy) the illustrations are all on plate paper except for the two on the sheet preceeding page 27.  This copy is bound in blue cloth which is similar to, but not identical to, 8.1. Also, it is bound in blank, that is, without the gilt titling on the spine and the “Roger Payne” signature facsimile imprint on the front cover as in 8.1. Perhaps these copies were intended for presentation by Mr. Andrews who assumed they would be rebound.

 

Contemporary comments on this work, by Edmund Gosse, appeared in New Review, May, 1892, on page 631 as follows: “The ugliest books now current come over from America, but it is barest justice to add that the prettiest make the same voyage. I do not know where or when I have seen a more exquisite specimen of book craft than Roger Payne and his Art (the DeVinne Press), by Mr. W. Loring Andrews, of New York. Printed in noble type, with the blackest of ink, on Holland paper, illustrated by delicate facsimiles in colour of some of the great binder’s masterpieces, with its sober dark green cloth [all copies seen are in dark blue cloth] and rose-coloured fly-leaves, this little volume delights every sense…”

 

On April 22, 1892, Sarah T. Prideaux wrote to W.L.A. (Letter in Grolier Club library)— “I beg to thank you for your kindness in sending me a copy [of Roger Payne…] which will be a valuable adding to my collection of books on bookbinding…”

 

According to a contemporary prospectus for this work, 110 copies of the 120 copy issue (8.1) were available through Mr. S. P. Avery, Jr., 368 Fifth Avenue, New-York at five dollars each. The prospectus offered no copies of 8.2.

 

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9. Jean Grolier. New York, 1892.

 

Jean

Grolier

De Servier

Viscount d’Aguisy

Some Account Of His Life

And Of His Famous

Library

By William Loring Andrews

New-York MDCCCXCII

The De Vinne Press

 

Pot Quarto, pages 68. Fourteen illustrations.

 

“One hundred and forty copies printed on hand-made paper, and ten on Japan.”

“The plates [12 of which are printed in colors and gold] of bindings, of the Aldine medal, and of the facsimile page with Grolier’s signature are by Mr. Edward Bierstadt’s artotype process; the remaining illustrations are the work of the DeVinne Press.”

 

9.1. One hundred forty (140) copies on hand-made paper. Subscription price $10.00.

 

9.2. Ten (10) copies on Japan paper. Subscription price $15.00.

 

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10. The Bradford Map. New York, 1893.

 

The Bradford Map

 

The City Of New York

At The Time Of The Granting Of

The Montgomerie Charter

 

A Description Thereof Compiled By

William Loring Andrews

To Accompany A Facsimile Of An Actual Survey

Made By James Lyne And Printed By

William Bradford In 1731

 

New York

Printed At The De Vinne Press

1893

 

Pot Quarto, pages 115. Fifty-one illustrations, 11 of which are Bierstadt artotypes (ten of full page size and one of double-page size on Japan paper), 31 electrotypes in the text (so described by Andrews  although three are of full-page size), and head- and tail-pieces.

 

“One hundred and forty-two copies printed on plate paper and ten copies on Japan paper.”

 

10.1. One hundred forty-two (142) copies on plate paper. Bound with gilt floral endpapers. Subscription price $10.00.

 

10.2. Ten (10) copies on Japan paper. Bound with plain endpapers. Subscription price $15.00.

 

10.2.1 One copy is known of 10.2 but with the eleven artotypes printed on genuine vellum. It is a presentation copy, signed, from Andrews to Edward Bierstadt, the person who supplied the artotypes for the book.

 

Notes: This work has been honored in a strange manner. A small pamphlet called “An Olla Podrida of Typographical Curiosities Exhibited Friday, June 2nd, 1893, At a Meeting of the Sette of Odd Volumes, by the Librarian [Bernard Quaritch]” lists and describes eleven works including “A Romance of Chivalry in the Limousin language of Valencia,” Valencia, 1490; a 1493 edition of Epistola Christoferi Colom; very rare 1678 and 1685 editions of Edward Crocker’s Arithmeticks and other treasures. Listed right in the middle of the pamphlet is W.L.A.’s The Bradford Map of 1893 with the notation that “only 144 [sic.] copies printed, nearly all of which have been already dispersed. Love’s labour has assuredly not been lost in this instance; the product is a book in every way charming.” There is nothing to dispute about that statement, but I do not understand the designation Typographical Curiosity and how the book fit in with all the treasure that surrounded it. Perhaps it was nothing more than an attempt by Quaritch’s to sell the Andrews book.

 

David G. Francis, bookseller, of 12 East 15th Street, New York, notified the public, in a printed broadside, that “The whole edition consists of 152 copies, and the number for sale (all of which have been purchased by the undersigned) is limited to 120 copies, at $10.00 each…”

 

IMPORTANT QUESTION- WERE ALL THE 10 COPY ISSUE PLATES PRINTED ON GENUINE VELLUM?

 

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11. Among My Books. New York, 1894.

 

«Among My Books»

 

                                                                       —What rest is there

From wasting woes! what balm for care!

If ills appall or clouds hang low,

And drooping, dim the fleeting show,

I revel still in visions rare.

At will I breathe the classic air,

The wanderings of Ulysses share;

Or see the plume of Bayard flow

                                                                       Among my books.

 

Whatever face the world may wear—

If Lillian has no smile to spare,

For others let her beauty blow,

Such favors I can well forego;

Perchance forget the frowning fair

                                                                       Among my books.

 

Samuel Minturn Peck.

 

Printed For William Loring Andrews

At The De Vinne Press. New-York: 1894

 

Crown Octavo, pp. viii, 32. Twenty-seven (27) full page illustrations, 13 of which are artotypes (4 in colors and gold) and 14 electrotypes. All illustrations, but one, are on Japan paper. That one is mounted on Japan paper.

 

“This edition of «Among My Books» consists of two copies on vellum, numbered 1 and 2, ten copies on Japan paper numbered from 3 to 12, and thirty eight copies on Holland paper, numbered from 13 to 50.”

 

11.1. Two (2) copies, numbered 1 and 2, on genuine vellum with plates on Japan paper.

 

11.2. Ten (10) copies, numbered 3 to 12, on Japan paper.

 

11.3. Thirty-eight (38) copies, numbered 13 to 50, on Holland paper.

 

Notes: This book was not published for sale. The limitation leaf information quoted above is slightly expanded in copies of 11.2 with the additional printed words— “Presented to           With the compliments of the Author.” Copies of 11.3 were usually signed with initials.

 

The only copy seen of 11.1 (copy #1 of 2) was sold at Christie’s, New York, on December 5, 1991 for $17,600. It is in a magnificent binding, by the Club Bindery, dated 1903.  This is the very copy that Nikirk (1978) reported as selling at the M.C.D. Borden sale on February 17, 1913 at the “fantastic high” price of $420. On April 5, 1938 at the Cortlandt Bishop sale it dropped to $220, but on  April 20, 1979 it brought $5,000. The price achieved in 1991 was probably due to a combination of facts cited in diminishing order of importance—  it was in an exceptional Club Bindery binding; it was printed on genuine vellum; it was a book-about-books; it was written by William Loring Andrews. What percentage each variable contributed to the price achieved is difficult to say, but the book was catalogued by Christie’s as a binding. A proof copy, on genuine vellum, of Andrews’ bookplate by Edwin Davis French was bound in.

 

Some notes inscribed by the author in copies of 11.3 are as follows:

1. “This book was intended for presentation only, but about 18 copies were sold.”

2. “Comparatively only a few copies were printed of this book as the writer did not feel that it would be of general interest. May 18th/14.”

3. “For the De Vinne Press. W.L. Andrews.” The De Vinne Press bookplate reads: “Office Copy…Not to be carried to Workrooms or elsewhere.”

 

In a letter to W.L.A. from E. D. North, on the letterhead of Charles Scribner’s Sons, dated March 17, 1894 and in the Grolier Club Library, is the following “…As I anticipated ‘Among My Books’ has sold like hot cakes. Can we have five more?… Everybody admires the book greatly. Mr. Scribner is also securing a copy…”

 

In aother letter at the Grolier Club, from F. E. Hopkins of the De Vinne Press to W.L.A., dated 3-3-1894 and probably referring to “Among My Books,” is the following: “I sometimes think that I will never give another estimate. It is only a guess, made before the work is actually done; and one cannot help omitting some items which he should have put in…The presswork was much more troublesome than I had anticipated…Will you not admit that if Mr. Bierstadt’s plates cost nearly $300.—all of our work…is worth as much?…When the work is finally done I will charge it just as low as possible; and you may congratulate yourself on having a Grolier book at half price. Certainly the Club does not get its books for so little money as you get yours…” There probably was much price negotiating going on between Andrews and the De Vinne Press and the next book described, A Stray Leaf, was the last that they produced for him. The Gillis Press printed all of his work thereafter.

 

It is remarkable, even if one allows for some duplication, that this book, produced in an edition of only fifty copies, has appeared at public auction 45 times over the years.

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12. A Stray Leaf. New York, 1894.

 

A Stray Leaf

From The

Correspondence

Of

Washington Irving

And

Charles

Dickens

 

By

 

William Loring Andrews

Printed At The DeVinne Press

New-York, 1894

 

And Embellished

With Engravings

On Copper And Zinc

 

Square Octavo, pages 40. Seven illustrations (5 electrotypes and 2 engravings on copper by Edwin Davis French).

 

“The DeVinne Press certifies that this copy of ‘A Stray Leaf from the Correspondence of Washington Irving and Charles Dickens’ is one of an edition of seventy-seven copies, all of which were printed on Japan paper in the month of September, 1894. The first fifteen copies numbered 1 to 15 contain proofs of three states of the copperplate engraving of the steamship Britannia.”

 

12.1. Fifteen (15) copies, numbered 1 to 15, printed on Japan paper and illustrated with proofs, in three states, of the copperplate engraving of the steamship Britannia.

 

12.2. Sixty-two (62) copies, numbered 16 to 77, on Japan paper and illustrated with a copperplate engraving of the steamship Britannia. Subscription price $5.00.

 

Notes: In all copies (of both issues) examined, the numeral 9 of the pagination at the bottom of page 39 has been omitted.

 

The frontispiece plate(s), depicting the Steamship Britannia after the painting by Clarkson Stanfield, and Mr. Andrews’ Imprimatur are the two Edwin Davis French engravings present. The imprimatur is a small reproduction after the painting The Sower by Jean Francois Millet (1814-1875) which Andrews also used in some of his other publications.

 

In copies of 12.2, a single frontispiece plate of the steamship has been utilized with its name spelled correctly—“Britannia.” In 12.1 three (3) proof plates of this engraving are used as frontispieces but the final state, with the name spelled correctly, was, curiously,  not included.

 

In Edwin Davis French, A Memorial. His Life..His Art, New York, 1908, by Ira H. Brainerd, the proof states are described as—a. Unfinished proof. b. Proof before letters. c. With inscription (“Brittania” incorrectly spelled).

 

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13. A Short Sketch of Bookbinding. New York, 1895.

 

A

Short Historical Sketch

Of

The Art of Bookbinding

by

William L. Andrews

 

With a Description of

the Prominent Styles

by

William Matthews

 

Edition 50 copies

 

Copyright, 1895, by William L. Andrews and William

Matthews.

 

New York

1895

 

Small octavo, pages [2], 3-51. Six illustrations (halftones).

 

13.1. Fifty (50) copies on Japan paper. Subscription price $1.00.

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BOOKBINDING

 

BY

 

William L. Andrews

 

AND

 

William Matthews

 

ART LOAN

MONOGRAPHS

 

 

 

 

Small octavo, pages 44. Six illustrations (halftones). Another edition, cheaply printed from the same galleys with slightly different pagination and with a different title page— “Published for the benefit of the Art Loan Exhibition held April, 1895.”

 

13.2. Unknown number of copies published for the benefit of “The Art Loan Exhibition,” 1895.

 

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14. The Old Booksellers of New York. New York, 1895.

 

 

The Old Booksell-

ers of New York

And Other Papers

By

William Loring Andrews

New York: Anno Domini One Thou-

sand Eight Hundred And Ninety-Five

 

Octavo, pages [x], 84, [vi]. With three full page engravings on copper by Edwin Davis French, “An E. View of Trinity Church N. York,” “Nassau Street, New-York,” and “Government House,”  and a facsimile reproduction of the title page of Nathaniel Ames’s Almanac for 1760.  Head- and tail-pieces and initial letters from designs by E.D. French. Printed by The Gilliss Press.

 

“The edition is limited to 142 copies. One hundred and twenty-two copies on hand-made paper, the plates on Imperial Japan paper; ten copies on hand-made paper, the plates on India paper, mounted; and ten copies on Imperial Japan paper, with additional proof of each plate before letter.”

 

14.1. One hundred twenty-two (122) copies on hand-made paper with the plates on Imperial Japan paper. Subscription price $7.50.

 

14.2. Ten (10) copies on hand-made paper with the plates on India paper, mounted. Subscription price $20.00.

 

14.3. Ten (10) copies on Imperial Japan paper with an additional proof of each plate before letter. Subscription price $20.00.

 

Notes: It is not mentioned in the limitation material in the book, but in at least one copy of 14.2 the plates are signed in pencil by the engraver.

 

In Brainerd (1908), it is stated that: “The engravings appear in two states, one unfinished and unsigned, in the Imperial Japanese [sic.] Vellum edition [14.3] of this book.” In one copy examined the three plates–  1. “An E. View of Trinity Church N. York,” exists in three states (two proofs and one complete), 2. “Nassau Street, New-York,” is in four states (three proofs and one complete) and “Government House” in two (one proof and one complete). In all cases the final version of the print is signed in pencil by E.D. French.

 

The first plate (“An E. View of Trinity Church N. York”) and the third plate (“Government House”) are re-engravings by Mr. French after originals from the New York Magazine, printed in the years 1790 and 1795. The second plate, “Nassau Street, New-York,” is an original engraving created by him for this book.

 

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15. Portraiture of the Revolutionary War. New York, 1896.

 

An

Essay On

The Portraiture Of

The American Rev

olutionary War

Being

An Account of a number of the Engraved

Portraits connected therewith, re-

markable for their rarity or

otherwise interesting

By

William Loring Andrews

To which is added an

Appendix

containing lists of portraits of Revolution-

ary characters to be found in various

English and American pub-

lications of the eighteenth and the

early part of the nineteenth century

Illustrated

with reproductions by the Photogravure Process

of twenty of the Original Engravings

New York

Printed by Gilliss Brothers for the Author

and sold by Dodd, Mead & Co.

MDCCCXCVI

 

Royal Octavo, pp. 100. Twenty illustrations (reproductions by the photogravure process of the original engravings). Printed by The Gilliss Press.

 

“Of this book there have been made one hundred and eighty-five copies on hand-made paper and fifteen copies on Imperial Japan paper, the printing of which was completed in the month of April, 1896.”

 

15.1. One hundred eighty-five (185) copies on hand-made paper. Subscription price $10.00.

 

15.2. Fifteen (15) copies on Japan paper. Subscription price $20.00.

 

Notes: Mr. Andrews had an extensive collection of the portraiture of the American Revolutionary War and used many items from his collection for depiction in this book. It is most likely that this book exists because he had this collection of portraits.

 

The photogravure reproductions are excellent, complete with plate-marks. Andrews took pains to be sure that these prints would not be removed from the book and sold as originals by adding the word COPY, in the tiniest of letters, to each one.

 

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16. The Journey of the Iconophiles. New York, 1897.

 

The Journey Of

The Iconophiles

Around New York In Search Of

The Historical And Picturesque

 

Printed At New York

In The Year Of Our Lord, Eighteen

Hundred And Ninety-Seven…And

Of The Discovery Of The Island Of

Manhattan By Hendrick Hudson The

Two Hundred And Eighty-Eighth

 

 

 

Royal Octavo, pp. xi, 48. One frontispiece illustration (view of the Battery, New York, in 1793—a full page engraving on copper) by Edwin Davis French. Printed by The Gilliss Press. Bound in card covers with printed glassine wrappers.

 

“Of this book there have been made eighty-seven copies on Imperial Japan paper and six copies on American hand-made paper, the printing of which was completed in the month of January MDCCCXCVII”

 

16.1. Eighty-seven (87) copies on Imperial Japan paper. Subscription price $4.00.

 

16.1.1. Copies are known of 16.1 but with the frontispiece plate in two states, one a proof before letters. Probably not published for sale.

 

16.2.  Six copies (6) printed on American hand-made paper with

the frontispiece plate in two states, one a proof before letters. Probably not published for sale.

 

Notes: The use of printing on glassine wrappers is unusual. Andrews’ name does not appear on the titlepage of this book and occasionally it is not attributed to him when offered for sale. Andrews composed this work to accompany copper-engraved prints by E. D. French of twelve views of New York City.  These prints comprise the first series of the publications of The Society of Iconophiles and is sometimes found bound with the book. The original subscription price for the prints was $24.

 

In Brainerd (1908), on page 83, is the following statement— “The Journey of the Iconophiles…Six copies on American hand-made paper have the frontispiece in two states, before letters and complete.” Copies issued with the second frontispiece plate but printed on Imperial Japan paper, are not mentioned. In any case, Andrews never listed, in any reference known to me, any copies of this work with two frontispiece engravings.

 

Mr. Andrews owned a copy of 16.1.1, in full morocco, stamped with the of Iconophiles’ seal and containing a third plate by Edwin Davis French entitled “Government House” which originally appeared as Plate III in his The Old Booksellers of New York and Other Papers. This copy was bound with the twelve Society of Iconophiles views of New York City, in signed artist’s proofs-before-letters. Another copy of 16.1.1 is known in original wrappers which retains William Loring Andrews’ presentation bookplate engraved by Mr. French.

 

 

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17. A Prospect of the Colledges. New York, 1897.

 

A Prospect Of The

Colledges In Cam-

bridge In New Eng-

Land…….. Engraved

By Wm. Burgis In 1726

The Description

Compiled by

William Loring Andrews

Published And For Sale By

Dodd, Mead And Company

New York

MDCCCXCVII

 

Large octavo, pp. [x], 38. Ribbed red cloth. Title stamped in gilt on spine and front cover. Six photogravure illustrations, one a folding plate. Printed by The Gilliss Press.

 

“Of This Edition of ‘A Prospect of the Colledges in Cambridge in New England’ there have been printed twenty-five copies on Imperial Japan paper and one hundred and fifteen copies on hand made paper, of which one hundred and thirty are for sale.”

 

17.1. Twenty-five (25) copies on Imperial Japan paper. Subscription price $15.00.

 

17.2. One hundred fifteen (115) copies on hand-made paper with plates on Japan paper. Subscription price $7.50.

 

Notes: THIS TITLE DOES NOT HAVE COPIES NUMBERED ON LIMITATION PAGE. Copies of 17.1 have top edges gilt but are identical to 17.2 in every other way.

The copy of 17.1 in the sale of the library of Alexander M. Hudnut, (American Art Association, November 3, 1926) was accompanied by a duplicate set of the illustrations on large, cabinet size, stiff paper.

 


 

18. New Amsterdam, New Orange, New York. New York, 1897.

 

New Amsterdam

New Orange

New York

A Chronologically Arranged

Account Of Engraved Views

Of The City From The First

Picture Published In MCDLI

Until The Year MDCCC

By

 William Loring Andrews

Published And For Sale By

Dodd, Mead And Company, New York

Anno Domini MDCCCXCVII

 

Octavo, pp. xxxi, 142. Fifty-eight illustrations (3 photo-engravings in color, 31 photogravures on copper, 3 photogravures on gelatin in color. “Lines to the Reader,” 7 head-bands, 7 initial letters and 7 tail-pieces (although only 6 tail-pieces are called for in the List of Illustrations) engraved on copper by Edwin Davis French. Printed by The Gilliss Press.

 

“Of this edition of New Amsterdam New Orange New York there have been printed on Imperial Japan paper thirty copies, with extra impressions of the Engravings on copper by E. Davis French; on American hand made paper one hundred and seventy copies and of the Duke’s Plan in color issued separately, one hundred copies.”

 

Notes: “Lines to the Reader” is not identified as such as it was done in Andrews’ “A Prospect of the Colledges in Cambridge in New England,” (17.) but is in the form of a quotation, from Geffroy Whitney, printed in a frame.

 

There is an error in the list of illustrations. The portrait of Francis faces page 6 and not page 4 as printed.

 

18.1. Thirty copies (30) on Imperial Japan paper with additional impressions before letterpress of the head-bands, initial letters and tail-pieces. Subscription price $50.00.

 

18.2. One hundred seventy (170) copies on American hand made paper. Subscription price $15.00.

 

18.2.1. Two (2) copies were produced uncut. All others are gilt. (Not seen.) See notes.

 

 

Notes: The preliminary limitation statement by Andrews is not entirely correct, as there is no second impression of “Lines to the Reader” from 18.1 but Andrews has added additional impressions of two plates, each in a second state. The first, the photo-engraving of The Duke’s Plan frontispiece is in two states of coloring, one partly colored and the second complete. The second plate, the photogravure of Carwitham’s Southwest View of the City of New York, has been duplicated in a hand-colored version. The List of Illustrations in the extra-limited issue has been modified to mention this Carwitham plate. A copy of 18.2 appeared in a Swann Galleries sale of 15 April, 1971 with the following note on the inside cover- “Only 2 copies made uncut. Tops gilt on all other copies.” A Japan paper copy of this work published at $50 equaled Andrews' highest price for one of his books.

 

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19. Fragments of American History. New York, 1898.

 

Fragments Of

American

History

Illustrated Solely By The Works

Of Those Of Our Own Engrav-

ers Who Flourished In

The XVIIIth Century

Privately Printed

For

William Loring Andrews

New York MDCCCXCVIII

 

Small Octavo, pp. [xvi], 69. Half calf and marbled boards. Marbled end papers. Title page in red and black. Eighteen illustrations (4 in color), reproductions of the original engravings by various photo-reproductive processes, mostly photogravures. Printed by The Gilliss Press.

 

“Of this edition of Fragments Of American History there have been printed eighty copies on American hand made paper and thirty copies on Imperial Japan paper.”

 

19.1. Eighty (80) copies on American hand made paper. Subscription price $12.50.

 

19.2. Thirty (30) copies on Imperial Japan paper. Subscription price $15.00.

 

Notes: In the list of illustrations on page xv, “47” is an error for “46.” Dodd, Mead & Company issued a prospectus for this work offering for sale 72 of the 80 copies on hand-made paper.

 

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20. French Eighteenth Century Engravers. New York, 1898.

 

A Trio

Of

Eighteenth Century

French Engravers

Of

Portraits

In Miniature

Ficquet

Savart

Grateloup

William Loring Andrews

New York MDCCCXCVIII

 

Octavo, pp. xv, 125. Twenty-eight illustrations (one in color), being reproductions of original engravings, with title page designed and engraved on copper by Edwin Davis French. Printed by The Gilliss Press.

 

“Of this book there have been printed one hundred and sixty-one copies on Imperial Japan paper bearing the stamp of the Japanese government mill and no longer exported.”

 

20. One hundred sixty-one (161) copies on Imperial Japan paper. Subscription price $16.00.

 

Notes: Additionally, this book includes a description of the principal methods of print-making by engraving on metal. In my observation this work appears in booksellers’ catalogues more often than any other of Andrews’ titles and seems to remain unsold for longer periods of time.

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21. Sextodecimos et infra. New York, 1899.

 

Sextodecimos

et infra

 

William Loring Andrews

New York: Published by

Charles Scribner’s Sons

Anno Domini : mdcccxcix

 

Small Octavo, pp. xiii, 118. Twenty-seven illustrations (15 in colors and gold), 12 reproductions of titlepages, illuminated titlepage, illuminated initial and headband. Printed by The Gilliss Press.

 

“Of This Book There Have Been Printed 140 Copies On English Hand-Made Plate Paper And 12 Copies On Imperial Japan Paper”

DESCRIBE BINDING.

 

21.1. One hundred forty (140) numbered copies on English hand-made plate paper. Subscription price $10.00.

 

21.2. Twelve (12) numbered copies on Imperial Japan paper. Subscription price $20.00.

 

Notes: Issued in chemise and slipcase. The copy number from the limitation page is stamped on the spine of the chemise. An additional copy is known of this title on Imperial Japan paper, that is not part of the edition. This copy contains the following information hand inscribed on the limitation page: “This copy is a slightly mutilated printers sample, the property of Gillis Brothers and is not included in the edition.” The “mutilation” consists of three clipped lower page corners not affecting text. It seems likely that the Gillises did not have their client’s permission to save that copy when one considers Andrews’ statement in his bibliography that— “Frequently we would find ourselves in possession of perfect copies considerably in excess of the number called for in the certificate of the book, and these we were necessarily obliged punctiliously to destroy. It seemed a wicked waste of paper, printer’s ink and skilled labor, but it was unavoidable.”

 

An article by W.L.A. of six pages and illustrations, with the above title, appeared in The Book Buyer, Vol. XVI, No. 5, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1898.

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22. James Lyne’s Survey. New York, 1900.

 

James Lyne’s Survey

Or, As It Is More Commonly

Known

The Bradford Map

A Plan Of The City Of New York At The

Time Of The Granting Of The

Montgomery Charter

In 1731

An Appendix

To An Account Of The Same

Compiled In 1893 By

William Loring Andrews

New York

Dodd, Mead & Company

MDCCCC

 

Octavo, pp. [x], 38. Three facsimile maps, reproduced by the Bierstadt process. Printed by The Gilliss Press.

 

“Of This Book There Have Been Printed Thirty-two Copies On Imperial Japan Paper And One Hundred And Seventy Copies On Holland Paper.”

 

22.1. Thirty-two (32) copies on Imperial Japan paper. Subscription price $6.00.

 

22.2. One hundred seventy (170) copies on Holland paper. Subscription price $4.00.

 

 

 

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23. Gossip About Book Collecting. New York, 1900.

 

Gossip About

Book

Collecting

By

William Loring Andrews

Volume I [Volume II]

New York

Published By Dodd, Mead

And Company. . . MCM

 

Octavo, two volumes. Volume I, pp. [xii], 98; Volume II, pp. viii, 102. Twelve illustrations (6 in color heightened with gold); frontispiece to each volume, the copperplate by Sidney L. Smith, the vignette on title-page by Edwin Davis French. The colored prints are by the Bierstadt process. Printed by The Gilliss Press.

 

“This edition is limited to Thirty-two copies on Imperial Japan paper, and One hundred and twenty-five copies on Holland paper

Namely:

Two copies on Imperial Japan paper for copyright.

One copy on Imperial Japan paper for the author.

Twenty-nine copies on Imperial Japan paper for subscribers.

One copy on Holland paper for the author.

Eight copies on Holland paper for presentation.

One hundred and sixteen copies on Holland paper for subscribers.

The right is reserved to print a limited number

of extra copies of the gelatine print in color by

Edward Bierstadt, and also of the copper-plate en-

gravings by Sidney L. Smith, none of which will be

offered for sale with the exception of ten copies of the “View of Broadway” which will be printed for the Society of Iconophiles of New York.”

 

23.1. Thirty-two (32) copies on Imperial Japan paper. Subscription price $34.00.

 

23.2. One hundred twenty-five (125) copies on Holland paper. This limitation includes 23.2.1 below. Soft boards. Slip case. Subscription price (for 116 copies) $17.00.

 

23.2.1. Eight (8) copies on Holland paper but with a special leaf containing a presentation blank. Not seen, but see Notes.

 

Notes: In copies of 23.1, the plates in color, “Italian Manuscript XVI Century” facing page 3 and “Livre D’ Heures XV Century” facing page 45, are present in two states, one printed on Japan paper and one on genuine vellum. Also in these copies the frontispiece plate to volume 2, “A Corner Of The Library Of The Author” engraved by Sidney L. Smith, contains, at the lower right, a small remarque engraving of Andrews’ Paul Revere  teapot and a reproduction of Revere’s hallmark. This engraving does not appear in the Holland paper copies.

 

In a letter to Orien B. Dodge, Esq., of Manchester, N.H., dated March 13, 1901, Andrews wrote:

“Dear Sir-

Your note of Mar 9th received-

I regret that anyone who really cares to have my books cannot secure them at the subscription price - but it appears that we make our editions either a little too large or a little too small. I made the edition of “Gossip” small because I did not think many would care to buy an expensive book of this personal character.”

 

In a copy of 23.2. in a laid in holograph note dated 11-26-1900 Andrews wrote: I am rather sorry to see the price go up as what goes up, generally has to come down.”

 

In their Catalogue 73 of November, 1904, Dodd, Mead & Company, Fifth Avenue & Thirty Fifth Street, New York (the publishers of the book), offered the following for sale: “One of eight copies on Holland Paper [of Gossip About Book Collecting 23.2.1] for presentation with a special leaf containing a presentation blank.” They considered this book to be Mr. Andrews’ autobiography.

 

 

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24. Of the Extra Illustration of Books. London, 1900.

 

Of The Extra Illus-

Tration Of Books

 

By W. L. Andrews

 

London: Zaehnsdorf

Cambridge Works

144-146, Shaftesbury Avenue

MCM

 

Duodecimo, pp. (4) 5-14, (2). Blue printed wrappers, stitched. Printed by the Chiswick Press.

 

“By the courtesy of W.L. Andrews Esq. of New York, I am allowed to reprint this interesting brochure On the ‘Extra Illustration of Books.”

 

24. Unknown number of copies.

 

Notes:  This essay first appeared in The Book-Lover’s Almanac For The Year 1895 on pp. 11-17.

 

Andrews did not include this title in the bibliography he prepared in 1911.

 

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25. Iconography Battery and Castle Garden. New York, 1901.

 

The

Iconography

Of The

Battery

And

Castle Garden

By

William Loring Andrews

New York

Charles Scribner’s Sons

MCMI

 

Pot Quarto, pp. xvii, 44. Twenty illustrations (2 in color of which one is a folding plate) [NOTE: ILLUS. ON P 23 PARTIALLY COLORED], being reproductions of the original engravings and relief plates by the line and half-tone processes. Printed by The Gilliss Press.

 

“Of this book one hundred and thirty-five copies have been printed on American hand-made paper and thirty-two copies on extra quality Japan paper from the Imperial Government Mill.”

 

“Thirty additional copies of the Van Dyk Plan have been printed for private distribution. None of these will be offered for sale.”

 

“An attempt has been made in this little book to produce on hand-made paper, composed of linen rags and not of wood-pulp, illustrations as satisfactory in character as it is possible to obtain by the use solely of the reproductive processes of the present day.”

 

25.1. One hundred thirty-five (135) copies on American hand-made paper. Olive-green ribbed cloth. Subscription price $7.00.

 

25.2. Thirty-two (32) copies on Imperial Japan paper. Light-brown ribbed cloth. Subscription price $12.00.

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26. Paul Revere And His Engraving. New York, 1901.

 

Paul Revere

And His

Engraving

By

William Loring Andrews

New York

Charles Scribner’s Sons

MCMI

 

TO BE CHECKED. ESP. “BOSTON MASSACRE PLAN” Octavo, pp. xiv, 171. Thirty-three illustrations as follows: One photogravure on copper printed in colors, title-page engraved on copper, by Edwin Davis French; 15 photogravures on copper by F.A. Ringler process, 1 plate (Boston Massacre) engraved on copper by Sidney L. Smith, 7 head-bands, 7 tail-pieces and 1 ornamental design engraved on copper by Sidney L. Smith. Printed by The Gilliss Press. Author’s imprimatur on half-title.

 

“Of this book there have been printed one hundred and thirty-five copies on Van Gelder paper and thirty-five copies on extra quality Imperial Japan paper made by the Imperial Government Mill.”

 

“The right is reserved to print a few extra copies of the illustrations in this book, none of which, however, will be offered for sale.”

 

“The Manuscript of this Book was completed in August, nineteen hundred and one. The printing was finished in November, nineteen hundred and one.”

 

26.1. One hundred thirty-five (135) copies on Van Gelder paper. Subscription price $23.50. Bound in blue paper with Imperial Japan paper spine and corners and with the engraved head-band to Chapter 1 printed on Imperial Japan paper and pasted on to front cover. Blue endpapers.

 

26.2. Thirty-five (35) copies on extra quality Imperial Japan paper. Subscription price $40.00. Bound in Imperial Japan paper, with the engraved head-band to Chapter 1 stamped on front cover. Imperial Japan endpapers.

 

Notes: A copy of 26.2 is known with the title-page in two states, one complete and the other before the engraver’s signature in-the-plate; the latter signed in pencil by Edwin Davis French. This copy is no longer in the publisher’s binding however, but the original covers were retained and are bound in at the rear.

 

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27. Bibliopegy In The United States. New York, 1902.

 

Bibliopegy

In The

United States

And

Kindred Subjects

By

William Loring Andrews

Dodd, Mead

And Company

New York

1902

 

Octavo, pp. xx, 130. Title page, 2 head-bands and 2 tail-pieces designed and engraved by Sidney L. Smith, and 30 reproductions of book bindings and book illustrations in black and white, and colors and gold. Printed by The Gilliss Press.

 

“Of this Book there have been printed one hundred and forty-one copies on Van Gelder paper and thirty-six copies on Imperial Japan paper from the Imperial Government Mill.”

 

27.1. One hundred forty-one (141) copies on Van Gelder paper. Dust jacket, slip case. Subscription price $23.50.

 

27.2. Thirty-six (36) copies on Imperial Japan paper. Subscription price $40.00.

 

Notes: Extra impressions of the engraved title, head-bands and tail-pieces are present in 27.2.

 

Writing in her essay Early American Bookbinding by Hand 1636-1820, Hannah D. French stated “In 1902…the appearance of William Loring Andrews’ study of American bookbinding, with its generous collection of plates, did much to introduce the subject and call attention to a field worthy of investigation.”

 

This work is one of the earliest on American bookbinding.

 

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28. Treatyse of Fysshynge Wyth An Angle. New York, 1903.

 

The Treatyse Of Fysshynge Wyth

An Angle. From The Book Of St.

Albans, Printed By Wynkyn de

Worde At Westminster In The

Year MCCCCLXXXXVI. With

An Introductory Essay Up

on The Contemplative

Man’s Favorite Recre

ation By William

Loring Andrews

New York

MCMIII

 

Pot Quarto, pp. [iv,] lxxxvi, colophon. Printed in black letter, wood-cut border and outline illustrations. Printed by The Gilliss Press.

 

“Printed at The Gilliss Press from type cast specially for this book, patterned after the traditional Old English character first used by Wynkyn de Worde: Published by Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York. Mcmiii.”

 

28. One hundred sixty (160) copies on American hand-made paper. Subscription price $16.50.

 

Notes: This book was published, bound in genuine vellum with ribbon ties, in a three-part dust jacket with titling on both spines and a paper covered slipcase. Of all of Andrews’ books in the larger limitation category, this work seems to be the scarcest in the antiquarian book-market. An unbound, sewn copy of this book is known with the inscription “Printers own copy” lightly penciled on a preliminary leaf. It is in an original paper jacket. See 21.2 for a similar survival.

 

 

 

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29. New York As Washington Knew It. New York, 1905.

 

New York

As

Washington

Knew It After The

Revolution

By

William Loring Andrews

New York

Charles Scribner’s Sons

1905

 

Octavo, pp. xvi, 92. Title page, frontispiece, 13 head-bands and tail-pieces designed and engraved by Sidney L. Smith, and 3 facsimiles. Printed by The Gilliss Press.

 

“Of This Book One Hundred And Thirty-Five Copies Have Been Printed Upon French Hand-Made Paper, And Thirty-Five Upon Imperial Japan Paper From The Japanese Government Paper Mill At Tokio. The Right Is Reserved To Print A Few Extra Copies Of The Engravings By Mr. Smith, None Of Which Will Be Offered For Sale.”

 

“A Study In Book-Making In Plain Black And White In Which Typography And Copper-Plates Engraved By Hand Are The Only Agencies Employed.”

 

29.1. One hundred thirty-five (135) copies on French hand-made paper. Subscription price $18.00.

 

29.1.1. Unknown number of copies of 29.1 but with a second impression of the frontispiece plate printed in colors.

 

29.2. Thirty-two (32) copies on Imperial Japan paper. Subscription price $30.00.

 

Notes: 29.1.1 is particularly interesting when one considers Mr. Andrews’ statement above about this work’s being “A Study In Book-Making In Plain Black And White…”

 

Copies of 29.2 in publisher’s binding are known with a remarque design, the head of an eagle, lightly engraved in the lower left margin of the frontispiece.

 

One of the engravings by Mr. Smith, number 4 on page 5, had a very interesting history. In Goodspeed’s catalogue 250 of 1935, as part of a foreword entitled “How Goodspeed’s Began,” Charles E. Goodspeed told of his early experiences— “Another forger, whose identity so far as I know has never been discovered, presented his wares so cleverly that he found easy victims.” This “forger” sold Mr. Goodspeed a group of items related to the Revolutionary era spy, Major André. One was a small manuscript map of lower New York, dated October 2, 1780, which bore the initials “H.C.” presumably for Sir Henry Clinton. Mr Goodspeed continued— “This ‘André’ lot remained in my hands for some time. One day the late William Loring Andrews of New York, on looking it over, questioned my judgment in condemning the material. When I related the whole circumstances, however, he had to admit that I was right. ‘But,’ he added, ‘I never saw that map of New York before, and it is just the kind of map which I am looking for to illustrate the book which I am writing on New York as Washington Knew It at the Close of the Revolution. I should like to use it in my book.’ ‘Very well,’ I said, ‘you are quite at liberty to do so, and I will make no charge for its use for that purpose, but I want you to understand very clearly what my opinion of it is.’’’ The map appears in the book with no discussion, explanation or any acknowledgement to Mr. Goodspeed. Incidentally, the final title of this book is New York As Washington Knew It After The Revolution.

 

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30. An English XIX Century Sportsman. New York, 1906.

 

An

English XIX Century

Sportsman

Bibliopole

And

Binder Of Angling Books

By

William Loring Andrews

New York

Dodd, Mead & Co.

MCMVI

 

Octavo, pp. xviii, 63, 8. Title page designed and engraved on copper by Sidney L. Smith, 16 photogravures. Printed by The Gilliss Press.

 

“Of this book there have been printed one hundred and twenty-five copies on Van Gelder hand-made paper and thirty-two copies on Imperial Japan paper.”

 

30.1. One hundred twenty-five (125) copies on Van Gelder hand-made paper. Subscription price $13.00.

 

30.2. Thirty-two (32) copies on Imperial Japan paper. Subscription price $22.50.

 

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31. The Continental Insurance Company. New York, 1906.

 

The Continental

Insurance Company

Of New York

1853—1905

A Historical Sketch

Compiled

By

William Loring Andrews

A Director Of The Company

New York

The Continental Insurance Company

M C M V I

 

 

Octavo, pp. vii, 54, [8]. Nine illustrations (half-tones). Printed by The Gilliss Press.

 

31.1. One thousand (1000) copies on plain paper. For private distribution.

 

31.2. One hundred (100) copies (approximately) on Holland paper. For private distribution.

 

31.3. Unknown number of copies on Japan paper, bound in greyish-green ribbed cloth, with the illustrations tipped in.

 

Notes: It can safely be assumed that all copies were intended for private distribution.

 

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32. Jacob Steendam. New York, 1908.

 

Jacob Steendam

Noch Vaster

A Memoir

Of The

First Poet In New Netherland

With

Translations Of

His Poems Descriptive

Of The

Colony

New York

Dodd, Mead & Co.

MCMVIII

 

Pot Quarto, pp. 76. Photogravure portrait of Steendam as frontispiece. Printed by The Gilliss Press.

 

“Of This Book One Hundred And Fifteen Copies Have Been Printed, All On Van Gelder Hand-Made Paper Manufactured In Holland”

 

32. One hundred fifteen (115) copies on Van Gelder hand-made paper. Subscription price $7.50.

 

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33. The Heavenly Jerusalem. New York, 1908.

 

The

Heavenly Jerusalem

A Mediæval Song

Of The Joys Of The

Church Triumphant

With Annotations By

William Loring Andrews

New York

Charles Scribner’s Sons

MCMVIII

 

Octavo, pp. xxviii, 78. Photogravure title-page. Second title and frontispiece designed and engraved by Sidney L. Smith, rubricated initials and an illuminated copy of a page from a XVth Century musical manuscript. Printed by The Gilliss Press.

 

“Of this book one hundred and twenty copies have been printed upon “Arches” hand made paper; twenty-seven copies upon Imperial Japan paper and five copies on special French Japan paper.”

 

33.1. One hundred twenty (120) copies on Arches hand-made paper. Subscription price $14.00.

 

33.2. Twenty-seven (27) copies on Imperial Japan paper. Subscription price $25.00.

 

33.3. Five (5) copies on Special French Japan paper. Probably published for private distribution.

 

Notes: In, at least, two copies of 33.3 an upper-case letter “F” has been hand inscribed by the author, in black ink, on the lower-left margin of the limitation page.

 

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William Loring Andrews also wrote the following:

 

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34. Introduction to Transactions of the Grolier Club, Part II.

 

Transactions of the Grolier Club

of the City of New York

from July 1885 to February 1894.

Part II.

 

New York, 1894

 

34. Seven hundred fifty copies of this title on hand-made paper.

 

Notes: Andrews evidently wanted to record his authorship of this introduction despite its having been published without any indication of same. A printing  of this introduction from the same type exists which he has inscribed at the bottom of the last page— “Wm. Loring Andrews. All [is mine]  but the last paragraph which was supplied by F. A. Castle at the time Secty of the Club.” The head- and tail-pieces and illustrations in this copy, which was bound in full morocco by the Doves Bindery in 1895, differ from those in the Introduction. Andrews most likely had it printed and bound for personal use.

 

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35. Prefatory Note to Washington's Reception. New York, 1903.

 

 

 

 Washington’s Reception

 By the Ladies of Trenton

Together with the

CHORUS

Sung as he passed under the

Triumphal Arch

Raised on the Bridge over

The Assunpink

April Twenty-First

MDCCLXXXIX

 

 

 

Quarto, four illustrations, printed glassine wrappers over card covers. Published by The Society of Iconophiles. Printed by The Gillis Press.

 

“Of this book one hundred and four copies have been printed on American hand-made paper and the plates destroyed.”

 

 

35. One hundred four (104) copies of this title on American hand-made paper.

 

Notes: The Prefatory Note, comprising pages 1-6, is all of the original work in this book. The balance is reprinted from other sources. The use of printed glassine wrappers as was done in 16. is unusual.

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36. “New York in 1733,” in Views Of Early New York. New York, 1904.

 

Views

Of

Early New York

With Illustrative Sketches

Prepared For The

New York Chapter Of The

Colonial Order Of

The Acorn.

New York

Privately Printed

MCMIV

 

Small quarto, vi, 142 pp., six engravings on copper by Edwin Davis French. Embossed seal of the society is stamped on upper and lower covers.

 

“This copy is one of an edition of two hundred and thirteen copies printed during the month of May Nineteen hundred and four.”

 

36. Two hundred thirteen (213) copies of this title.

 

Notes: Andrews’ chapter in this work comprises pages 89-110.

 

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37. Introduction entitled “David T. Valentine,” pages ix-xxvii in Illustration Index to Valentine Manuals. New York, 1906.

 

An Index To

The Illustrations

In The

Manuals of The Corporation Of The

City of New York

1841-1870

Society of Iconophiles

New York 1906

 

Octavo. Orange cloth, gilt stamping. Gillis Press.

 

37. Two hundred fifty copies of this title printed for members of the Society of Iconophiles. Subscription price $3.50.

 

Notes: The Manuals of the Corporation of the City of New York are popularly known by their compiler’s name, i.e. “Valentine Manuals.” Members of the Society of Iconophiles were permitted to subscribe for a second copy of this index. The balance was sold to the public by Charles Scribner’s Sons as announced in a surviving prospectus— “Messrs. Charles Scribner’s Sons have secured from the Society of Iconophiles 170 copies of the ‘Index to the Illustrations in Valentine’s Manuals,’ being the entire edition except those delivered to the members of the Society. The introduction is by Mr. William Loring Andrews. Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York.” It is interesting to note that W.L.A.’s introduction was the single part of this work featured by Scribner’s in the prospectus.

 

 

 

 


 

38. Introduction to The Engravings Of The Society of Iconophiles. New York, 1908.

 

Catalogue

Of

The Engravings

Issued By

The Society Of

Iconophiles

Of The City Of New York

MDCCCXCIV — MCMVIII

Compiled by Richard Hoe Lawrence

With An Introduction By

William Loring Andrews

New York

Anno Domini MCMVIII

 

Quarto, xii, 87 pp. One-half morocco. Stamped in gilt on upper and lower covers with the seal of the society.

 

“Of This Book One Hundred And Twenty-Five Copies Have Been Printed On Special O. W. Hand-Made Paper And Twelve Copies On Imperial Japan Paper.”

 

38.1. One hundred twenty-five (125) copies of this title on Old Whatman hand-made paper.

 

38.2. Twelve (12) copies of this title on Imperial Japan paper.

 

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39. Foreword (pages 15-20) to The Hudson-Fulton Celebration. New York, 1910.

 

Gustav Kobbé

The Hudson-Fulton

Celebration

MCMIX

With A Foreword

By

William Loring Andrews

New York

Society of Iconophiles

MCMX

 

Small quarto, xiv, 64, iv pp. Boards, stamped in gilt with the Society of Iconophiles seal on upper and lower covers.

 

“Of This Book One Hundred And Six Copies Have Been Printed On O. W. Handmade Paper And Sixteen Copies On Imperial Japan Paper.”

 

39.1. One hundred six (106) copies of this title on Old Whatman handmade paper.

 

39.2. Sixteen (16) copies of this title on Imperial Japan paper.

 

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William Loring Andrews contributed to the following:

 

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40. Andrews’ Early Books at Yale. New Haven, 1913.

 

Catalogue

Of The

William Loring Andrews

Collection Of Early Books

In The

Library Of Yale University

 

New Haven : Yale University Press

London : Humphrey Milford

Oxford University Press

MCMXIII

 

 

40.1. One of 300 copies. Not illustrated.

 

40.2. One of an unknown number of copies (but probably within the total 300 copy limitation) in publishers’ binding with three (3) illustrations that relate to books in the collection. The illustrations, printed on Japan paper, were re-used from Among My Books, an Andrews work of 1894. They are: 1. (facing page 5)— “Page from the Biblia Latina Vulgata, printed by Fust & Schoeffer, Mentz, 1462,” 2. (facing page 6)— “Xylographic Print from the Vader-boeck, Printed by Peter Van Os, 1490” and 3. (facing page 8)— “Portion of page printed at Strasbourg in 1470.”

 

Notes: The books described in this catalogue were given by William Loring Andrews to Yale University in 1894 after his oldest son, Loring, died in a hunting accident while a student there.

 

That assumption that Andrews had some part in the writing of this work is based on the fact that a manuscript work in his hand has survived (it is currently in my collection) with the following title—The First Century of Printing Illustrated by 34 Printed Books From the most noted early Presses with Two Manuscripts on vellum of the 15th Century added as stepping stones between the arts of Chirography and Typography. The author of the printed catalogue, librarian Addison Van Name, almost certainly used these notes in the preparation of his work.

 

Philip C. Duschnes, writing in his catalogue number 122 (Duschnes, c 1956), “Fine Binding. Fine Printing...Complete List of William Loring Andrews Publications” considered the book to be, essentially, the publication of this manuscript (which he had for sale at that time) but in an expanded state.

 

In one of the illustrated copies of the book, 40.2, (which were most likely produced for W.L.A.’s personal use) is the following inscription— “This catalogue made by the Librarian of Yale University is in my opinion one that could not be improved upon. W.L. Andrews May 18/ 14—”

 

 

 

Compare MANUSCRIPT OF THIS WORK to printed book!!!

 

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Transactions of the Grolier Club. Did A. write other intros? Not Part IV.

 

The Bookman, year?, contains the first appearance of “The Old Booksellers of NY.”

 

The Bookman, July, 1904, contains “The First Poet of New Netherland.”

 

IMPORTANT ARTICLE— Vagaries of Book Collecting in “The Lamp,” March, 1903, pp. 102-209

 

Miscellaneous items.

 

A Memorial to Theodore Crane Andrews, born July 2, 1862, died December 20, 1878. Privately printed. New York, 1879. Octavo, 26 pages, cloth. Not seen, but listed in Swann Galleries sale 378, March 18, 1954.

 

In memory of Loring William Andrews, died while a member of the senior class at Yale College. Privately printed at the DeVinne Press, New York, 1882. Square octavo, 40 pages, cloth. Not seen, but listed in Swann Galleries sale 378, March 18, 1954.

 

Bibliography of Books Issued in Limited editions by William Loring Andrews During The Years 1885 to 1908 inclusive. N.p., n.d. One of four (4) typewritten copies with a signed presentation inscription from the author and a note in his hand reading “First Edition - 4 Copies.” Not seen, but contained in a list of Andrews’ books for sale by Barnet B. Ruder, 40 East 49th Street, New York. List in LHC library.

 

Bibliography of Books Issued in Limited editions by William Loring Andrews During The Years 1885 to 1908 inclusive. Third Edition. Privately Printed. New York. 1911. Not seen.

 

Prospectuses for “Roger Payne And His Art,” “Fanny, A Poem,” “The Bradford Map” and “Fragments of American History” “Prospectus of the Colledgers.” and “Index to Illus in Valentine”, in LHC library.

 

Tracy Dows’ typewritten inventory of “Publications of W.L. Andrews” in his library, dated February 1, 1901. In LHC library.

 

(Auction Catalogue). The William Loring Andrews Collection Of Maps, Views, Prints And Books Relating To New York And Other Americana. The Anderson Galleries, 489 Park Avenue, New York, April 18 & 19, 1921. The books were consigned by James F. Drake who had purchased them from W.L.A. in 1919.

 

Proces Verbal. Is this an Andrews publication? Elias Dexter, New York, 1866. Pròces Verbal Of The Ceremony Of Installation Of President Of The New York Historical Society, As It Will Be Performed February 8, 1820. [One of 35.] “Reprinted 1864. Thirty-Five Copies. No. 12.” A penciled note states—“Only 35 printed for Wm. L. Andrews.” It does  seem like one of Andrews’ early reprints, and it was done during the time period that Andrews produced similar items, but since it is a presentation copy—“To W L  Andrews from his friend Evert A Duyckinck  New York February 22. 1866,” this seems unlikely. Extra-illustrated with portraits of David Hosack (who was the one installed as president); Gulian C. Verplanck (proof before letters); and John A. Graham, “an Installator on the occasion.” Loosely inserted are portraits of Duyckinck and George Washington. This item, now disbound, was Lot 231 in the W.L. Andrews sale (LHC 188) of April, 1921, but without mention of the Duyckinck presentation inscription! There is, apparently, no copy of this at NYHS.

 

 

 

Fine Binding, Fine Printing… Complete List of William Loring Andrews Publications. Catalogue Number 122 of Philip C. Duschnes, New York, n.d.

 

Books by W.L. Andrews from the Alexander M. Hudnut library, lots 20 to 66, sold by American Art Association, New York, November 3 and 4, 1926. Photocopy in Andrews folder.

 

Book Lover’s Almanac all five issues from 1893 to 1897.

 

“Vagaries of Book Collecting” in The Lamp, March, 1903, pp. 102-209.

 

Robert Nikirk. “Two American Book Collectors of the Nineteenth Century: William Loring Andrews and Beverly Chew” in Book Buying and Bookselling, Chicago, 1978.

 

 

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WORKS CONSULTED.

 

American Art Association. (1926). The Alexander M. Hudnut Sale. Catalogue of sales of November 3 and 4. New York.

 

Anderson Galleries. (1921). The William Loring Andrews Collection Of Maps, Views, Prints And Books Relating To New York And Other Americana. Catalogue of sales of April 18 & 19. New York.

 

(Andrews.) (1926). In Memoriam. William Loring Andrews. New York.

 

Brainerd, Ira H. (1908). Edwin Davis French. A Memorial. His Life..His Art. New York.

 

Dows, Tracy. (1901). Publications of W. L. Andrews. Typescript, one page, legal size. [New York.]

 

Dodd, Mead & Co. (1904). Books from Private Presses, Club Publications, and Limited Editions. Catalogue No. 73. New York.

 

Duschnes, Philip C. (c. 1956). Fine Binding, Fine Printing… Complete List of William Loring Andrews Publications.  Catalogue Number 122. New York.

 

Goodspeed, Charles E. (1935). Catalogue 250. Books, Prints, Autographs, Bookplates. Boston.

 

Gillis, Walter. (1926). Recollections Of The Gillis Press And Its Work During Fifty Years 1869-1919. New York.

 

Grolier Club. (1894). Transactions of the Grolier Club of the City of New York from July 1885 to February 1894. Part II. New York.

 

Grolier Club. (1899). Transactions of the Grolier Club of the City of New York from February 1894 to July 1899. Part III. New York.

 

Grolier Club. (1921). Transactions of the Grolier Club of the City of New York from July 1899 to December 1919. Part IV. New York.

 

Grolier Club. (1959). A Retrospective to Celebrate the Seventy-fifth Anniversary of The Grolier Club in New York. New York.

 

Lawrence, Richard Hoe. (1930.) History Of The Society Of Iconophiles Of New York. MDCCCXCV-MCMXXX. New York.

 

Nikirk, Robert. (1978). Two American Book Collectors of the Nineteenth Century: William Loring Andrews and Beverly Chew. Book Buying and Bookselling, pages 99-118.

 

Ruder, Barnet B. (N.D.). First Editions of the Works of William Loring Andrews. One page bookseller’s list of ten items, each priced. New York.

 

Swann Galleries. (1954). Sale No. 378, March 18, 1954. New York.

 

Tredwell, Daniel M. (1892.) A Monograph on Privately Illustrated Books; A Plea for Bibliomania. Flatbush.

 

Webber, W. Hallam. (1980). William Loring Andrews. A Study And Bibliography. Rockville.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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